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20121205
20121213
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KPIX (CBS) 6
WJZ (CBS) 2
WUSA (CBS) 2
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Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
CBS
Dec 9, 2012 6:00pm EST
diplomats say is bad and getting worse. despite its air power the assad regime appears increasingly on the defensive against rebel forces which according to israel's ambassador to the u.s. include a growing number of radical islamist. >> the jihadi presence is big and getting bigger. and the longer the conflict goes on there, the bigger it will get. >> the jihadies are an offshoot of al qaeda in iraq which ones fought a no holds bar battle against american troops. according to jeffrey white a former analyst for the defense intelligence agency, they are now turning the tide against the assad regime. >> they are very good. they give the rebels a combat edge. they are quite willing to dichlt they fight on all key fronts. they're involved in many of the key actions. >> these are not people we want to win. >> but the rebels making inroads on damascus itself, monitoring of syrian bases like this where chemical weapons are stored has detected evidence the assad regime may be preparing to use them in a last ditch attempt to save itself, an act the obama administration has warned could trigger
CBS
Dec 8, 2012 6:30pm EST
airport the assad regime's lifeline to its few remaining allies. >> reporter: the outskirts of damascus have become a battleground with some of the fiercest fighting the city has seen yet. syrian rebels say they're closing in on the capital street by street. now, within their sights is their biggest target. the damascus international airport, about 12 miles southeast of the city. heavy dom bardment is reported today in the suburbs in the surrounding area. rebel leaders called the airport a legitimate target and gave a stark warning to the regime and outside travelers to avoid it at all costs. fighting near the airport forced the suspension of commercial flights this week. some airlines have already stopped all together. a rebel takeover of the airport would also cut off weapon supplies and allies like iran says andrew tabler of the washington institute near east policy. >> as the country's longest runways, from that location that jets from iran land, carrying a lot of sophisticated weapones, so knocking that location out. taking it over and holding it would allow the rebels to
CBS
Dec 6, 2012 7:00pm EST
on monday, david martin reported that the assad regime had given orders to prepare chemical weapons for possible use to put down the revolt that has been raging in that country for more than a year and a half. president obama said the use of these weapons of mass destruction would be totally unacceptable. well tonight, david has new intelligence to report, and we have three stories on the breaking news in syria. we'll start with martin at the pentagon. >> reporter: u.s. intelligence so far has not detected any signs syria is loading chemical weapons on to aircraft, but defense secretary panetta said it appears the embattled assad regime is preparing to do just that. >> there is no question that we remain very concerned very concerned that as the opposition advances, in particular on damascus that the regime might very well consider the use of chemical weapons. >> reporter: monitoring of syrian basis like this one has pekd up evidence engineers have loaded the chemicals which combine to form the deadly nerve agent sarin into bombs that could be dropped airplanes. satellites have seen
CBS
Dec 12, 2012 5:30pm PST
share sarah's vision for a freer, more democratic syria without assad. s ter: borter: but after walking e freshhe fresh graves of young younghe knew and who were killed n the last 21 months of fighting, sarah's stress and fi exhaustion start to show. what's your biggest fear now? >> reporter: but staying alive is getting harder and harder as the decisive battle for damascus closes in. elizabeth palmer, cbs news, the amascus suburbs. urbs.lley: california's governor reveals he has cancer. smugglers are moving drugs using their own submarines and they're in love with the number 12. when the "cbs evening news" continues. visit. mississippi, alabama, louisiana or florida, they're gonna love it. shaul, your alabama hospitality is incredible. thanks, karen. love your mississippi outdoors. i vote for your florida beaches, dawn. bill, this louisiana seafood is delicious. we're having such a great year on the gulf, we've decided to put aside our rivalry. now is the perfect time to visit anyone of our states. the beaches and waters couldn't be more beautiful. take a boat ride, go fishing
CBS
Dec 11, 2012 5:30pm PST
administration will endorse one of the rebel groups that is now fighting to overthrow bashar al- assad. who are these new american allies? clarissa ward found their leader in brussels. >> reporter: moaz al-khatib is the man chosen to lead a newly formed coalition of syria's opposition groups. what does it mean to be recognized by the u.s.? "the u.s. administration has big influence globally" he told us. "a step like that would pull the rug from under the regime on all levels: politically, economically, and militarily." the damascus-born cleric has long been an outspoken critic of the syrian government. he's been jailed several times since the uprising began. in july, he finally fled to cairo. now he travels the world asking for international support for syria's opposition. do you feel that the international community has done enough to help syria? >> not at all. >> reporter: "the international community fell short in its support to the syrian people" he said. "but it's starting to wake up now." so far, though, the u.s. has refused to arm the rebels because of concerns about the rising role
CBS
Dec 4, 2012 5:30pm PST
. syria's civil war is getting closer to the dictator. today there were battles between the assad military and rebels around the capital, damascus, a mortar slammed into a school near the capital, killing at least nine students. it's not clear who fired it. outside journalists rarely get inside syria, but our elizabeth palmer reached damascus and the families suffering there. >> reporter: this is the new normal in damascus: going to work past military checkpoints. random explosions and heavily armed soldiers. trying to ignore the charred wreckage of car bombs, knowing there will be others which could explode any time, anywhere. a twin blast in a neighborhood last week killed more than 30 people. the community rallied to repair shattered windows and walls, but any feeling of security is gone. across the capital, people are gradually adjusting to the encroaching war. "my children don't go to school any more" this man told me. "and everyday we hear the noise of shelling all around us." does it scare you at night? >> of course, i'm not scared about them. >> reporter: you're not scared? >> no.
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)